Herniated Disc or Pinched Nerve or Bulging Disc

A herniated disk refers to a problem with one of the rubbery cushions (disks) between the individual bones (vertebrae) that stack up to make your spine.
A spinal disk is a little like a jelly donut, with a softer center encased within a tougher exterior. Sometimes called a slipped disk or a ruptured disk, a herniated disk occurs when some of the softer “jelly“ pushes out through a crack in the tougher exterior.
A herniated disk can irritate nearby nerves and result in pain, numbness or weakness in an arm or leg. On the other hand, many people experience no symptoms from a herniated disk. Most people who have a herniated disk don’t need surgery to correct the problem.

Herniated disc facts

  • The discs are pads that serve as “cushions” between the vertebral bodies, which minimize the impact of movement on the spinal column.
  • Each disc is designed like a jelly donut with a central softer component (nucleus pulposus).
  • Abnormal rupture of the central portion of the disc is referred to as a disc herniation.
  • The most common location for a herniated disc to occur is in the disc at the level between the fourth and fifth lumbar vertebrae in the low back.
  • If the disc herniation is large enough, the disc tissue can press on the adjacent spinal nerves that exit the spine at the level of the disc herniation.
  • The physical examination, imaging tests, and electrical tests can aid in the diagnosis of a herniated disc.
  • Depending on the severity of symptoms, treatments for a herniated disc include physical therapy, muscle-relaxant medications, pain medication, anti-inflammation medications, local injection of cortisone (epidural injections), and surgical operations.
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